Will Nato membership for Finland be good for migrants and minority rights?

by , under Enrique Tessieri

If truth Is the first casualty in war, then the second casualty is the loss of your civil rights.

Finnish President Sauli Niinistö and Prime Minister Sanna Marin are due to announce Thursday that Finland should join Nato “without delay,” according to The Guardian.

While Finland’s security concerns are valid enough for its giant eastern neighbor and what’s happening in Ukraine, the rushed pace of our membership in Nato has stymied debate about Finland’s major foreign policy shift.

One of the matters that worry me is if our hardened stance against Russia will continue to fuel our xenophobic tendencies. As a Nato member, will Finland find understanding to promote social equality for minorities, including Muslims, Africans, and people of color?

Another aspect that raises question marks is the National Coalition Party (Kokoomus).

Even if Nato will improve our security, the new tougher face of Finland could have a negative impact on our Nordic values and how they are applied to different groups.

Even if Nato improves our security, the new tougher face of Finland could undermine our Nordic values and how they are applied to different groups.

Disagree?

Apart from anti-immigrant stances, there is a lot of hostility in the air.

Kokoomus politicians like Kimmo Sasi, a former long-serving MP, and minister, said that it was ok for Finland to use violence to hold back refugees at the Finnish-Russian border.

Apart from the Islamophobic Perussuomalaiset, Kokoomus Kokoomus would be ready to shelve human rights.

President Sauli Niinistö is another politician who does not fuel trust. His prejudices and apparent ignorance about racism is one source that feeds Finland’s hostile environment against migrants and minorities, like what he once said about how an Iraqi was supposed to practice his culture in Finland.

Under his leadership, visible minorities would have little chance of improving their situation in Finland.