Posts Tagged: Human Rights

QUOTE OF THE DAY: Of course a child needs a mother and father!

“In today’s Finland, it is nothing uncommon for the Finnish Immigration Service (Migri) to reject family reunification by a Finnish spouse on the grounds that the child does not need a father.Doesn’t need a father? Migri should ask Argentina’s Mothers and Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo if the father, mother, and grandparents are key to a child’s identity and well-being.”

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Finnish Immigration Service: “Your wife’s unborn child can grow up without you; is the child going to be raised a Muslim?” PART II

Migrant Tales will publish the decision to reject Abdul a residence permit on family grounds. His wife, a Finn, is expecting their child that will be born in September.  Below is the decision by the Finnish Immigration Service (Migri) to reject Abul’s residence permit on family grounds. Unofficial translation: “The applicant and family reunification sponsor

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Finnish Immigration Service: “Your wife’s unborn child can grow up without you; is the child going to be raised a Muslim?”

 Apparently, there is no guarantee in Finland that marriage or having a child with a Finnish citizen will guarantee asylum and a residence permit. It is the case of Abdul,* who spoke on condition of anonymity, an Iraqi asylum seeker who came to Finland in 2015. Contrary to many like him, Abdul is married to a Finnish woman who is expecting their child in September. 

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After the Perussuomalaiset-Blue Reform, the National Coalition Party is the most anti-immigration party in the Finnish parliament

If you ask anyone in Finland which party thrives on anti-immigration sentiment and bigotry, the answer is simple: Perussuomalaiset (PS)* and Blue Reform. The difference between these two is that the former is a racist party that came out of the closet and the latter one which went back to the closet. Here’s the question:

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The Finnish League for Human Rights: Is Finland in need of hate crimes prevention law?

Hate crimes affect members of minority groups all over the world. Some countries take it more seriously than others by passing and enacting hate crime prevention laws, and by investigating suspected cases and prosecuting perpetrators so as to deliver justice to victims. The number of suspected hate crimes registered by Finnish police have increased more

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