Somali death in Finland: The problem that constantly mocks at us

by , under All categories, Enrique

By Enrique Tessieri

Migrant Tales was saddened to be tipped off that apparently another Somali national had died violently now in Espoo after it reported the tragic death of a Somali national in Oulu. The shock and outrage of the Somali community of the death of one of its members reveal their  mistrust for white Finnish society and the authorities. 

A blogger writes:  “Migrant tales, thank you for your releasing this information publicly. The victim was a Somali national and was murdered by his Finn brutal friends (see 17.2 thread by Akaaro).”

Matters are at a very poor state in Finland. So much so, in fact, that politicians like Jussi Halla-aho and the Perussuomalaiset (PS), who spread racism by declaring outright war against Somalis and Muslims, are elected to office and given important roles in parliament with the approval of other political parties.

Should we ask where the root of the problem lies? It lies right under our noses and inside all of us.

While violence is a good measuring stick that reveals how our society has failed some of its members, it is especially tragic when it happens to a group like the Somalis.

According to an April 2009  survey by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA), one in three Somalis in the Greater Helsinki area said that  he or she has been a victim of racially motivated crimes in the past 12 months.

The report states:  “The highest incidence rates for assault or threat was found for Somali respondents in Finland – where 74 incidents of assault or threat for every 100 interviewees were recorded. This very high rate reflects the fact that many Somalis in Finland were victims of assault or threat on several occasions within a 12 month period.”

Some Finns, who argue in a colorblind fashion, will claim that if both violent deaths in Oulu and Espoo aren’t a hate crime we should not even bother to report it.  It has no importance and is an insignificant matter like the shameful situation of Somalis in Finland.

Every time a Somali dies in Finland or any other person in fact due to a violent crime or if he or she is abused racially in public, our failure as a society in addressing these social ills always stares back at us.