African woman killed by her former white Finnish husband in the city of Lahti

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THE STORY WAS UPDATED

A 53-year-old white Finnish male fatally shot his African wife in Lahti on Sunday, according to tabloid Ilta-Sanomat. The couple had been separated and were at fighting in court over legal custody of their only child. The woman was 38.

The woman was allegedly from Zambia.

Read the original story (in Finnish) here.

The couple got married in northern Finland in 2016 but moved to the south of the country. They separated with the man living in Kouvola and the deceased woman in Lahti, located 64 kilometers.

Tabloids like Ilta-Sanomat, which have not apologized for their racist reporting of migrants like Somalis since the 1990s, and other media are quick to racialize gender-based violence.

Should we call this terrible act in Lahti a “crime of passion” since it involves a white man killing a black woman? If it were a Muslim killing his white Finnish wife, could it be called an “honor crime?”

Honor crime or crime of passion boil down to one matter: gender-based violence.

There is no “honor” or “passion” in killing women. It’s the same crime, and the killer is usually a man.

“Dynamic” duo Tavio and Purra bullying Muslim women for career and profit

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I would rather be a little nobody than to be an evil somebody. Anonymous

Perussuomalaiset MPs Ville Tavio and Riikka Purra are a bunch of bullies because they pick on some of the most vulnerable people of our society, in this case, Muslim women who want to wear burkinis.

Migrant Tales is not a vulnerable group, and we will say it in plain English: Both Tavio and Purra are Islamophobic opportunists.

Both of these far-right hotheads post on their Facebook wall that they have sent a written question to parliament complaining why the burkini is now at public swimming halls.

The written question comes from a non-discrimination ombudsman decision that deemed burkini prohibition at swimming halls discriminatory.

Both Tavio and Purra are sad examples of what is wrong with Finland.

Despite their kicking and bitching about migrants, and especially people of color, there is nothing that they can do to stop Finland from becoming ever-culturally diverse.

We will not forget their hateful language and we will ensure that our children and grandchildren never forget as well.

*A direct translation of Perussuomalaiset in English would be something like “basic” or “fundamental Finn.” Official translations of the Finnish name of the party, such as Finns Party or True Finns, promote in our opinion nativist nationalism and racism. We, therefore, at Migrant Tales prefer to use in our postings the Finnish name of the party once and after that the acronym PS.

Hate speech study and story by Yle: Interviewing the wolf guarding the sheep

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Ovem lupo commitere.

The saying in Latin, To set a wolf to guard sheep, raises the right question about a YLE news story on a hate speech study and how it intimidates politicians from expressing their opinions.

The study reveals that 75% of the messages come from anti-immigration groups, with the rest coming from left-liberal circles, according to Helsingin Sanomat, which quotes the study’s findings.

Forty percent of all politicians in the study admitted that they were intimidated by the hate speech. The party least affected by hate speech was the Islamophobic Perussuomalaiset (PS)*, according to Iltalehti.

Watch the news broadcast (in Finnish) here.

The study looked at 375,000 messages between March and August. Of these, 5,500 were hate messages from 2,200 accounts, of which 200 were the most active. Fifteen politicians received over 100 hate messages. These were PS chairperson Jussi Halla-aho, Green Interior Minister Maria Ohisalo, Prime Minister Antti Rinne, National Coalition Party head Petteri Orpo and Education Minister Li Andersson.

The study blames social media platforms like Twitter for allowing these types of hate messages to be sent to politicians even if they are against their community standards.

We could take the question a bit further: Why don’t the Finnish authorities, namely the police, openly demand social media platforms to follow their community standards?

Moreover, there are too few police, at the most 10, monitoring hate speech, according toan earlier Yle story. Last year, a mere 31 ethnic agitation cases ended up in, according to Migrant Tales, citing the justice ministry.

Going back to the wolf guarding the sheep, Yle interviews two MPs for the story that was aired Friday. They are PS MP Riikka Purra, who built her political career on Islamophobic soundbites, and Anna Kontula of the Left Alliance.

One does not need rocket science to discern that Finland’s hostile environment against migrants and minorities and growing hate speech derives from mainly one party: the PS.

Reija Härkonen asks the right question about the Yle story: “The Perussuomalaiset don’t consider hate speech a problem. Seventy-five percent [of hate messages] come from anti-immigration groups. Isn’t it really interesting that Yle‘s news chose to show how the Perussuomaliset party suffers [from hate messages]. According to Iltalehti, very few PS politicians said they were intimidated by hate speech.

Purra, who usually doesn’t speak anything more than bad about migrants, especially people of color, claiming they are unemployable freeloaders, and blasting black rapists as “human scum,” is the wolf guarding the sheep in the Yle story.

As she is interviewed by the reporter, Purra sheds crocodile tears to the camera about how she is a victim of hate.

“Today I received a letter from a person in Kuopio,” she said with a poker face, “where the person hopes that I die of cancer or get run over by a car. I’m told that I am a terrible person and that this curse will happen.”

Some friendly advice to Purra and her party: Stop victimizing migrants, stop your cooperation with neo-Nazis, and other Islamophobic far-right groups. Stop spreading hate.

It’s high time that Finland and the government start dealing with hate speech and racism.

This is not a request, but a demand.

  • A direct translation of Perussuomalaiset in English would be something like “basic” or “fundamental Finn.” Official translations of the Finnish name of the party, such as Finns Party or True Finns, promote in our opinion nativist nationalism and racism. We, therefore, at Migrant Tales prefer to use in our postings the Finnish name of the party once and after that the acronym PS.

Migrant Tales Podcast: Shirlene Green Newball chats with writers Shashank Mane and Hope Nwosu

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Shirlene Green Newball

Leaving one’s first home country, one acquaints herself and himself to new worlds and ways of thinking. For a writer and artist, this source can be used to give new perspectives and meaning. Both Shashank Mane and Hope Nwosu write about their experiences and the challenges that migrants face when they move to a new country.

Exposing white Finnish privilege #63: Silence and acting dumb are the swords of institutional racism

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There is one matter that makes my blood boil when there is a clear case of racist behavior, but the person hearing it, who can be your boss, remains silent, hoping that the uncomfortable situation passes over and returns to “normal.”

“Back to normal” in this case means that nothing has changed and challenged. Matters will remain as they are. Get over it.

A good example of how strong institutional racism is in Finland is a Council for Mass Media (JSN) ruling against Järviradio for playing (April 6) a racist song by Irwin Godman called “Sand n-word and n-word clown.”

The song, which is shamelessly racist and offensive to brown and black people in Finland, was released in 1989. It has been seen on YouTube three million times.

One wonders why these types of songs are played on Youtube.

To add more salt to injury, the Järviradio commentator played the song on the request from a listener who said, “The Perussuomalaiset* are taking back Finland.”

Another coating of populist racism.

White Finnish privilege #63

If the radio commentator should have known better that Goodman’s song is racist and inappropriate, which the JSN ruling reinforced, the editor of Järviradio, Markku Mäenpää, appears clueless.

Mäenpää said that he has no opinion about the song or the lyrics.

The only reason why Mäenpää does not have an opinion about Goodman’s racist song is that he does not think the lyrics are racist and offensive even after 30 years when the song was released.

Mäenpää’s statement is a shameful example of how institutional racism and prejudices find protection and see another day in Finland.

Goodman’s songs are racist, and his opinions about migrants only reinforce that he was multiculturally challenged.

One of his “hit” songs was “Marcello Magaroni.”

See also:

The far-right Perussuomalaiset (PS) party imploded on June 13, 2017, into two factions, the PS and New Alternative, which is now called Blue Reform. In the last parliamentary election, Blue Reform has wiped off the Finnish political map when they saw their numbers in parliament plummet from 18 MPs to none. A direct translation of Perussuomalaiset in English would be something like “basic” or “fundamental Finn.” Official translations of the Finnish name of the party, such as Finns Party or True Finns, promote in our opinion nativist nationalism and racism. We, therefore, at Migrant Tales prefer to use in our postings the Finnish name of the party once and after that the acronym PS.