Posts Tagged: mamu

Finland’s culturally diverse community must point out and scorn our Uncle Toms

What does it say about our society when second-generation children of migrants join far-right groups that spew racism? We have a few of them in Finland like Gleb Simanov and the even more notorious types like Junes Lokka, Marco de Wit, and Miki Sileoni. 

Of

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Migrant Tales (April 14, 2015): My identity is mine, not yours, so stop labeling me according to your prejudices

Why do some public services like the police even some migrants believe they have the right to define who are? The police do it constantly. Every time they label a person or group as a person with “foreign” or “migrant” background they are effectively relegating that person publicly to second- or third-class status in society.

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Uncle Toms, or mamus, are used to control minority groups

It’s interesting to read how some white Finns get all jumpy when you speak about Uncle Toms, or mamus, in Finland. One such blogger, Veli-Pekka Leivo, claimed that labeling someone a traitor to his ethnic group fuels and supports victimization.  Victimization? How much harm does an Uncle Tom do to members of his community by

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Should Finland’s Uncle Toms be called mamus?

Alarm bells go off inside of me whenever I hear migrants, who should know better, claim that racism isn’t a major issue in our society many times standing next to or speaking to white Finns. There are many reasons why a migrant may play down such a social ill. These may include ignorance, prejudice, lack

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Do “mamu” an “maahanmuuttajataustainen” downgrade people in Finland into “us” and “them?”

There are two words I’d be very careful with in Finland: mamu and maahanmuuttajataustainen especially at schools to single out third-culture children. The first label is the shortened word for maahanmuuttaja, or immigrant, while the second one means person with immigrant background.  Migrant Tales has written previously about the use of mamu like this blog entry above. Both

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