The PS and its Riikka Purras: Spreading hatred of minorities and migrants is ok

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THE STORY WAS UPDATED

One far-right politician who has eagerly spread white Finnish supremacist ideology is Perussuomalaiset (PS)* vice-chairperson and MP Riikka Purra. In her latest Facebook post, she attempts to defend her views with a chart that is misleading and racist.

One of the problems with Purra’s argument is that she speaks of white Finns as natives but excludes non-white Finns as eternal migrants or “people of migrant background.” In short, they are not “real” Finns and should be treated as a threat.

Purra’s arguments, which are filled with populist hot air and made in one of Europe’s whitest countries, aim to reinforce exclusion and hatred of people of color.

If you watch closely, the PS normally speak in code when spreading their racist views. When they talk about “harmful” migrants they mean Muslims and asylum seekers who came in 2015. When Purra talks about the “native” population she only means white Finns.

Far-right ideas like Purra’s are the same ones spread by US President Donald Trump and embolden white supremacists. One of its tragic manifestations was seen on Saturday in El Paso, Texas.

No matter the country, the white supremacist message is the same: Groups with power are afraid of minorities because they fear that when they become a majority, they will treat people like Purra in the same way as she talks and treats migrants and minorities today.

Apart from being a bunch of baloney, the chart, which was made by Kyösti Tarvainen, an astrologist, assumes that the Nordic region and Europe have always been white and that non-whites “invaded” the Nordic region. This type of thinking is what some call white supremacy. The chart shows the decline of the so-called “native” population but aren’t people, irrespective of their ethnic backgrounds, “natives?”

Considering that far-right and white-supremacist rhetoric is keenly copied and pasted by politicians in different countries that form part of a global network, it is surprising how our own denial and exceptionalism has made our media reluctant to ask tough questions to politicians spreading far-right ideology.

One of these after the tragedy in El Paso is if the same rhetoric spread by Purra and PS chairperson Jussi Halla-aho inspire people to start killing migrants and minorities in Finland?

Migrant Tales asked Purra this question in an email, but she did not reply.

MP Riikka Purra
“Hey, you spoke a while back about how the Finnish population can change with more non-white migrants and Finns. 
What happened in El Paso must have shocked you. Could the same happen in Finland?
Could you please answer this email by Wednesday? 
Thank you.

It would be wrong to blame Purra, Halla-aho and other PS pundits for the rise in racism in Finland. By blaming a party and its politicians, you lose sight of the root of the problem, which is our society.

The best way of challenging an Islamophobic party and far-right politicians is to take a good look at ourselves and take off the mask of denial.

The Perussuomalaiset (PS) party imploded on June 13, 2017, into two factions, the PS and New Alternative, which is now called Blue Reform. In the last parliamentary election, Blue Reform has wiped off the Finnish political map when they saw their numbers in parliament plummet from 18 MPs to none. A direct translation of Perussuomalaiset in English would be something like “basic” or “fundamental Finn.” Official translations of the Finnish name of the party, such as Finns Party or True Finns, promote in our opinion nativist nationalism and racism. We, therefore, at Migrant Tales prefer to use in our postings the Finnish name of the party once and after that the acronym PS.

After spreading white replacement pseudo-theories, PS MP Purra is silent whether the carnage in El Paso could happen in Finland

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Ethnonationalism and “white Finnish replacement” pseudo-theories are being eagerly spread in Finland by politicians like Riikka Purra and Jussi Halla-aho, vice-chairperson and chairperson of the far-right Perussuomalaiset (PS)* party.

An important question arises in light of the tragic weekend when a white supremacist killed 22 victims in El Paso, Texas, and another man killed 9 more in Toledo, Ohio: Could the same happen in Finland?

Since the Finnish media is not interested in asking such a question, I wrote an email to Purra on Sunday if what happened in El Paso could happen here since parties like the PS are pushing ethnonationalism and ethnic replacement pseudo-theories.

The email to MP Purra below was short and to the point:

MP Riikka Purra

“Hey, you spoke a while back about how the Finnish population can change with more non-white migrants and Finns.
What happened in El Paso must have shocked you. Could the same happen in Finland?
Could you please answer this email by Wednesday?
Thank you.

Purra did no answer my email.

In June, Purra suggested that Finland’s population, one of the whitest in Europe, is in danger of changing due to non-white migration.

The Perussuomalaiset (PS) party imploded on June 13, 2017, into two factions, the PS and New Alternative, which is now called Blue Reform. In the last parliamentary election, Blue Reform has wiped off the Finnish political map when they saw their numbers in parliament plummet from 18 MPs to none. A direct translation of Perussuomalaiset in English would be something like “basic” or “fundamental Finn.” Official translations of the Finnish name of the party, such as Finns Party or True Finns, promote in our opinion nativist nationalism and racism. We, therefore, at Migrant Tales prefer to use in our postings the Finnish name of the party once and after that the acronym PS.

Abdirahim Husu Hussein is absolved but Maiju Tapiolinna may have allegedly incited hatred against an ethnic group

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It was clear that the request to the police by Perussuomalaiseet (PS)* Councilperson Maiju Tapiolinna to investigate whether Helsinki City Councilperson Abdirahim Husu Hussein for ethnic agitation and slander would not make it to first base.

And that is what the police announced today. They said they will not investigate the complaint against Hussein for ethnic agitation and slander, reports Helsingin Sanomat.

But what could you expect? How could there be ethnic agitation if the PS is not an ethnic group and no person was mentioned in Hussein’s tweet?

What is most ironic about the case is that it appears that Tapiolinna may have herself been guilty of ethnic agitation in a Facebook posting today.

Anti-Hate Crime Oganisation Finland asked today the police to investigate a Facebook posting by Tapiolinna where she allegedly encourages hatred for an ethnic group.

Tapiolinna writes today: “Is anyone surprised why the police will not investigate Hussein’s tweets? Not me, I’m not surprised since this is exactly what I expected to happen. It is now proven that we have double standards [in Finlan] and people who come from racist countries can rage in peace. This means that in the future the Perussuomalaiset [party] should take an even tougher stand on immigration. It’s already been proven that Muslims that come here have difficulties to adapt to their new homeland. I am still of the opinion that if one is not happy with things here, they should think of moving somewhere else. We should surely take note of the [Vietnamese] boat people who came to Finland forty years ago. They are diligent and respect others. We are thus contentedly r..cists since this has happened.[1] The next thing we should do is investigate the enormous aid Somali associations received. It is good to continue from here.”

The police should investigate the matter and determine whether Tapiolinna is guilty.

The Perussuomalaiset (PS) party imploded on June 13, 2017, into two factions, the PS and New Alternative, which is now called Blue Reform. In the last parliamentary election, Blue Reform has wiped off the Finnish political map when they saw their numbers in parliament plummet from 18 MPs to none. A direct translation of Perussuomalaiset in English would be something like “basic” or “fundamental Finn.” Official translations of the Finnish name of the party, such as Finns Party or True Finns, promote in our opinion nativist nationalism and racism. We, therefore, at Migrant Tales prefer to use in our postings the Finnish name of the party once and after that the acronym PS.

[1] This sentence is unclear to translate. I asked Tapiolinna to explain what she meant but she has not responded.

Daniel Malpica: Problems with the Finnish Immigration Service

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So here is the story… Two years ago I applied to the Migration Office for a residence permit under the base of entrepreneurship (toiminimi). Later on that same 2017, I received a full-time working grant from Koneen Säätiö – Kone Foundation for my literature project Mutanttikieltä. I informed Migri about it arguing that my situation changed because the grant demanded for me a full-time commitment: silence…

Daniel Malpica. You can visit his website here.


Last August, a year ago, I received a letter from Migri (The Finnish Immigration Service) with an appointment at the airport-terminal 2, a rare thing but possible considering that I used to live in Vantaa. ‘Ok, good! I’m going to pick up my residence permit’ I thought. How naive.
Once there, the conversation went like this:
– Spanish, right?
– (Me) Yes, but I can handle it in English.
– No, no, we are gonna call an interpreter.
So then I got suspicious and decided to record the whole interview (which I used partly on my performance at Kiasma, lol). Once inside the office, they connected a telephone to the speakers with a Spanish-accent translator on the other side of the line. The statements in a nutshell were:
1. You applied as an entrepreneur.
2. But what you really want is to live from the stipend (Kone’s grant).
3. Anyhow, we consider that the country has enough ‘graphic designers’ (the area of my company at that time), therefore we consider it won’t be profitable.
4. So we ask you to leave Finland back to Mexico.
It was a surprise for me and for the person informing the decision. When they asked me for my opinion I said that I didn’t agree considering that I’ve been working professionally since 2013, that I had a full-time job here, and that my work had cultural value towards the country (even opening spaces for Finnish and non-Finnish authors, artists and emergent talents from the youth). Anyhow when I asked for their suggestions considering that they are the legal entity who knows about this cases they said: get a lawyer.
So I did, and the attorney told me that we were not going to win the case and that this process resets/erases my time living in Finland, he also said – let’s appeal to avoid deportation and meanwhile you can apply to a residence permit that is suitable to your status.
(By the way, in situations like this you have to pay first to the lawyer, then to the judge for making the appealing process and later for the new residence permit application. So a well-spent grant-salary I might say, isn’t it?)
Then time passed by, it’s 2019, the process has denied me the possibility of traveling outside the country and I have made already (based on different sources of counselling) my new application under the status of ‘Professional Artist’; an abstract and discriminatory kind of visa where being a restaurant musician is not worthy enough to be considered professional. Anyhow, I covered all the criteria: To live professionally of your work (Kone and my own company) and Being a member of an artists’ association (as a board member at Suomen Pen Finnish Pen and Globe Art Point. in my case). Before summer holidays Migri wrote to me asking for more supplementary documents regarding my other sources of income.
PEN and GAP made wonderful letters in Finnish on my support which I provided to Migri among all the invoices sent throughout my company (now ‘Manuke. Lit, Media Art & Design’): clicked and sent. Some days ago I received a message from Migri (deadline on August 16th) with another supplementary request which says:
[ – According to the documents you have provided, your grant with Koneen Säätiö was finished in June 2019. From what kind of work do you receive your main source of income now?
Please note, that if your main source of income comes from the work that you do through your own business, you should apply for entrepreneur’s residence permit. ]
An ‘Entrepreneur’s Residence Permit’, the same one that they rejected from me already. On top of that, this time they are politely suggesting me to make the ‘correct’ residence permit application (which they did not when I provided Kone’s grant decision two years ago), furthermore they waited ’til my grant got finish to make this repetitive request, and third… why do the work made within my company is not considered artistic professional work?
So, voidaan mennä varjoon! I mean, the ones who know me may have noticed that I am not a person that complains that much. I have found a home in Finland with the support of so many friends, colleagues and beloved ones; I wouldn’t be pushing forward otherwise.
I am generally quite positive, grateful and ambitious, but also critical and generally consistent. These two years have been mentally exhausting, it has made me feel demotivated, ashamed, depressed, self-destructive, a bit bitter, more difficult to be contacted affecting all the areas of my work… And it’s just sad, like feeling punished.
This is an issue that happens in even worst proportion to other people here, asylum seekers for instance. And a constant subject remains on the lack of proper information, a matter of basic accessibility. So with real respect to all of them, I kindly ask you for advice, because I have uncertainty and the only thing that I have done in this summer has been holding to my literature (poetry/life) and to my work, the ultimate beauty saloon that makes all these narratives enjoyable.
Here is my portfolio and, as always, thanks for watching
Last August, a year ago, I received a letter from Migri with an appointment at the airport-terminal 2, a rare thing but possible considering that I used to live in Vantaa. ‘Ok, good! I’m going to pick up my residence permit’ I thought. How naive.
Once there, the conversation went like this:
– Spanish, right?
– (Me) Yes, but I can handle it in English.
– No, no, we are gonna call an interpreter.
So then I got suspicious and decided to record the whole interview (which I used partly on my performance at Kiasma, lol). Once inside the office, they connected a telephone to the speakers with a Spanish-accent translator on the other side of the line. The statements in a nutshell were:
1. You applied as an entrepreneur.
2. But what you really want is to live from the stipend (Kone’s grant).
3. Anyhow, we consider that the country has enough ‘graphic designers’ (the area of my company at that time), therefore we consider it won’t be profitable.
4. So we ask you to leave Finland back to Mexico.
It was a surprise for me and for the person informing the decision. When they asked me for my opinion I said that I didn’t agree considering that I’ve been working professionally since 2013, that I had a full-time job here, and that my work had cultural value towards the country (even opening spaces for Finnish and non-Finnish authors, artists and emergent talents from the youth). Anyhow when I asked for their suggestions considering that they are the legal entity who knows about this cases they said: get a lawyer.
So I did, and the attorney told me that we were not going to win the case and that this process resets/erases my time living in Finland, he also said – Let’s appeal to avoid deportation and meanwhile you can apply to a residence permit that is suitable to your status.
(By the way, in situations like this you have to pay first to the lawyer, then to the judge for making the appealing process and later for the new residence permit application. So a well-spent grant-salary I might say, isn’t it?)
Then time passed by, it’s 2019, the process has denied me the possibility of traveling outside the country and I have made already (based on different sources of counselling) my new application under the status of ‘Professional Artist’; an abstract and discriminatory kind of visa where being a restaurant musician is not worthy enough to be considered professional. Anyhow, I covered all the criteria: To live professionally of your work (Kone and my own company) and Being a member of an artists’ association (as a board member at Suomen Pen Finnish Pen and Globe Art Point. in my case). Before summer holidays Migri wrote to me asking for more supplementary documents regarding my other sources of income.


PEN and GAP made wonderful letters in Finnish on my support which I provided to Migri among all the invoices sent throughout my company (now ‘Manuke. Lit, Media Art & Design’): clicked and sent. Some days ago I received a message from Migri (deadline on August 16th) with another supplementary request which says:
[ – According to the documents you have provided, your grant with Koneen Säätiö was finished in June 2019. From what kind of work do you receive your main source of income now?
Please note, that if your main source of income comes from the work that you do through your own business, you should apply for entrepreneur’s residence permit. ]
An ‘Entrepreneur’s Residence Permit’, the same one that they rejected from me already. On top of that, this time they are politely suggesting me to make the ‘correct’ residence permit application (which they did not when I provided Kone’s grant decision two years ago), furthermore they waited ’til my grant got finish to make this repetitive request, and third… why do the work made within my company is not considered artistic professional work?
So, voidaan mennä varjoon! I mean, the ones who know me may have noticed that I am not a person that complains that much. I have found a home in Finland with the support of so many friends, colleagues and beloved ones; I wouldn’t be pushing forward otherwise.
I am generally quite positive, grateful and ambitious, but also critical and generally consistent. These two years have been mentally exhausting, it has made me feel demotivated, ashamed, depressed, self-destructive, a bit bitter, more difficult to be contacted affecting all the areas of my work… And it’s just sad, like feeling punished.
This is an issue that happens in even worst proportion to other people here, asylum seekers for instance. And a constant subject remains on the lack of proper information, a matter of basic accessibility. So with real respect to all of them, I kindly ask you for advice, because I have uncertainty and the only thing that I have done in this summer has been holding to my literature (poetry/life) and to my work, the ultimate beauty saloon that makes all these narratives enjoyable.
Here is my portfolio and, as always, thanks for looking.

😀


[EXTRA NOTE]
Dear friends, if you want to share this story please copy and paste the text (cmd C / cmd V) in your timeline and tag me if you want. I am a public figure in Mexico, so I prefer to keep this message within my contacts and the contacts that you decided to share it with.
Kiitos ja paljon!”

Two sides of the same coin: El Paso white supremacist terrorist and Perussuomalaiset MP Olli Immonen and others of Finland

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The white supremacist terrorist that murdered 20 innocent people and wounded two dozen on Saturday in El Paso, Texas, published a manifesto declaring war on Hispanics.

He wrote: “Hispanics will take control of the local and state government of my beloved Texas, changing policy to better suit their needs. They will turn Texas into an instrument of a political coup which will hasten the destruction of our country.”

In 2015, Perussuomalaiset (PS)* MP and far-right Suomen Sisu head, Olli Immonen, declared war on multiculturalism. He did not mention Hispanics but meant Muslims and people of color:

Even if some 15,000 demonstrators repudiated what Immonen stated, the same hatred we saw spewed by Immonen is spread today by PS head Jussi Halla-aho and the party’s first vice president, Riikka Purra.

The Finnish media should ask these politicians some hard questions about the consequences of their hateful rhetoric.

The Perussuomalaiset (PS) party imploded on June 13, 2017, into two factions, the PS and New Alternative, which is now called Blue Reform. In the last parliamentary election, Blue Reform has wiped off the Finnish political map when they saw their numbers in parliament plummet from 18 MPs to none. A direct translation of Perussuomalaiset in English would be something like “basic” or “fundamental Finn.” Official translations of the Finnish name of the party, such as Finns Party or True Finns, promote in our opinion nativist nationalism and racism. We, therefore, at Migrant Tales prefer to use in our postings the Finnish name of the party once and after that the acronym PS.

Facebook: Pizza delivery car vandalized in a small town near Kuopio

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THE STORY WAS UPDATED

A local pizzeria’s delivery car was vandalized a week ago in a small town in Eastern Finland located near Kuopio. Is it a coincidence that the owner of the pizzeria isn’t a white Finn.

The last time we published a similar story was in March of a pizzeria in Espoo.

Just like Donald Trump’s racism has consequences for innocent victims in the most recent white supremacist attack in El Paso over the weekend, parties like the far-right Perussuomalaiset (PS)* are polarizing our society and emboldening racists.

The vandalized car. Source: Facebook.

The Perussuomalaiset (PS) party imploded on June 13, 2017, into two factions, the PS and New Alternative, which is now called Blue Reform. In the last parliamentary election, Blue Reform has wiped off the Finnish political map when they saw their numbers in parliament plummet from 18 MPs to none. A direct translation of Perussuomalaiset in English would be something like “basic” or “fundamental Finn.” Official translations of the Finnish name of the party, such as Finns Party or True Finns, promote in our opinion nativist nationalism and racism. We, therefore, at Migrant Tales prefer to use in our postings the Finnish name of the party once and after that the acronym PS.

Ethnonationalism and ethnic replacement pseudotheories are fuel for white supremacist terrorists. Politicians are accountable.

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Racism is a rabid dog that racists walk using a short leash to get attention and votes. The dog, which knows no master except for hatred, can bite its master hard.

The tragic terrorist attack in a Wal-Mart in El Paso, Texas, by a white supremacist terrorist, tells us loudly why the lethal brew of racism and ultranationalism can rip society in two. What happened on Saturday in El Paso will, unfortunately, happen again.

The terrorist, Patrick Crusius, 21, published a manifesto expressing anxiety about his future in the face of the Hispanic invasion of Texas.

Just like far-right parties in Europe talk about how white Christian Europe is being taken over by Muslims, Crusius expressed in his manifesto how Hispanics will take control of the local and state government and pass laws to suit their needs.

Far-right parties like the National Rally of France, Germany’s AfD, FPÖ of Austria, Finland’s Perussuomalaiset (PS)*, Hungary’s Viktor Orbán and others express the same concern as the El Paso killer: Being taken over and becoming a minority in their country.

PS politicians like Jussi Halla-aho, Riikka Purra, Laura Huhtasaari, and a long list of others like Olli Immonen of Suomen Sisu, PS Youth are spreading the same fear among Finns about being taken over by Muslims and people of color.

Spreading such lies in one of Europe’s whitest countries is not only irresponsible but reckless. It offers ammo to future terrorists.

The recent killings in El Paso and future ones tell us of the vital importance of building an inclusive society that is serious about tackling social ills like racism. Building a country based on social justice and respect for diversity is our best insurance for peace.

We can build such a society if we pull together.

The Perussuomalaiset (PS) party imploded on June 13, 2017, into two factions, the PS and New Alternative, which is now called Blue Reform. In the last parliamentary election, Blue Reform has wiped off the Finnish political map when they saw their numbers in parliament plummet from 18 MPs to none. A direct translation of Perussuomalaiset in English would be something like “basic” or “fundamental Finn.” Official translations of the Finnish name of the party, such as Finns Party or True Finns, promote in our opinion nativist nationalism and racism. We, therefore, at Migrant Tales prefer to use in our postings the Finnish name of the party once and after that the acronym PS.

Exposing white Finnish privilege #53: Why is our tolerance for racism is at street level

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When US President Donald Trump viciously attacked “The Squad” (Congresspersons Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib, Ayanna Pressley, and Ilhan Omar), when he told them to leave the country (see tweet below), there was dismay and outrage from politicians and other sectors of society.

In Finland, a politician like Maiju Tapiolinna can tell a Helsinki city Councilperson, Abdirahim Husu Hussein, who is a Finnish citizen, to go back to Somalia. Telling a person of color to leave the country is the most normal thing from a white Perussuomalaiset* politician.

In such a white society like Finland, the bar for what is racist and inappropriate is a way too low. White privilege and power keep it from rising as well as Malcolm X’s famous quote: “Racism is like a Cadillac, they bring out a new model every year.”

Maiju Tapiolinna’s Facebook post is a good example of the hostility that white Finnish fragility brings out in some people. She states: “Somalis should leave the country if they don’t integrate.” The Nurmijärvi PS politician has asked to police to investigate Hussein’s tweet so that that the police file charges against him. For what? The PS is not an ethnic group. Source Facebook and Sakari Timonen’s blog.

White Finnish privilege #53

One of the consequences of living in an overwhelmingly white society is that racism isn’t taken seriously as Hussein’s case proves even if you are a politician and black. It isn’t taken seriously because it isn’t in white people’s interest. Who cares what it’s like to be a person of color in Finland, right?

The predicament is similar to asking a man if he thinks there is sexism in Finland and how to eradicate it.

Why is it so difficult for the media and politicians in Finland to grasp that racism is a serious offense against our values and especially against the person at the receiving end? We proudly claim that we have one of the best education systems in the world, but still the second-biggest party in parliament is far-right and Islamophobic.

Migrant Tales recently asked the following question in an op-ed piece: “[w]hy aren’t the leaders of other parties saying anything substantial to defend and support Hussein who had the guts to speak out? Where is Prime Minister Antti Rinne, who is a member of the same party [Social Democratic Party] as Hussein? Where is Pekka Haavisto of the Greens, Left Alliance, Swedish People’s Party, and Center Party leaders? What about the National Coalition Party?

If some in the United States like Trump say and do racist things and claim they aren’t racist, in Finland, you usually hear silence from people who are indifferent to racism.

Doesn’t the Constitution guarantee that we are all equal before the law and that no person can be discriminated due to his or her background?

If you hear silence as an answer to that affirmation, you should start to worry.

See also:

The Perussuomalaiset (PS) party imploded on June 13, 2017, into two factions, the PS and New Alternative, which is now called Blue Reform. In the last parliamentary election, Blue Reform has wiped off the Finnish political map when they saw their numbers in parliament plummet from 18 MPs to none. A direct translation of Perussuomalaiset in English would be something like “basic” or “fundamental Finn.” Official translations of the Finnish name of the party, such as Finns Party or True Finns, promote in our opinion nativist nationalism and racism. We, therefore, at Migrant Tales prefer to use in our postings the Finnish name of the party once and after that the acronym PS.